Delta Force Die Hard

By: Carol Ericson

A soldier out for justice finds an unlikely ally

And an even more unlikely attraction...


Determined to discover who’s framing his commander for terrorism, Delta Force captain Joe McVie is faced with a mission unlike any other. One that involves socialite do-gooder Hailey Duvall. But Hailey Duvall isn’t what she seems...which is why someone wants her dead. And why Joe knows he’ll put everything on the line to keep the innocent beauty safe.

Red, White and Built: Pumped Up





“You’ve never been upstairs, have you?”


“I’ve never been invited.”

“I’m inviting you now. I even have toothbrushes up there.”

“Then it’s a done deal.”

Still holding Joe’s hand, she walked upstairs with him trailing behind her. She didn’t say another word, afraid of breaking this spell between them.

Her bedroom door stood open. “You have to see the view.”

He stood still at the entrance to the room as she let go and made her way to the windows. Then she heard him whisper across the darkness. “I’m looking at the only view I wanna see right now.”

His words sent a thrill through her body.

She stretched out her hands. “Come to me, Red.”

She made room for him at the window, and their shoulders nestled together. “Isn’t it beautiful?”

He draped his arm over her shoulder and twisted his head to look at her. “The most beautiful view I’ve ever... Oh, my God, get down!”

And the tender moment ended as glass shattered around them.







CAST OF CHARACTERS

Hailey Duvall—A wealthy philanthropist, Hailey lands in the middle of a terrorist plot. When her fellow aid workers start mysteriously disappearing, she turns to a Delta Force soldier for protection and advice, even though his own agenda just might be at odds with hers.

Joe McVie—This Delta Force soldier will do anything to clear the name of Major Rex Denver, his commander who’s been accused of being a traitor, and he plans to start with the lies of a wealthy socialite—but the rich girl turns out to be more than he bargained for.

Marten de Becker—An aid worker who has gone on record claiming that Major Rex Denver was behind the blast at the camp. Now he has a different story, but will he live long enough to share it?

Andrew Reese—This British journalist reporting on the Syrian refugee crisis has dropped off the face of the earth—until Hailey receives a terrifying video as a warning.

Ayala Khan—A Syrian American nurse, she’s dedicated to helping her people, but her passion may have turned into a dangerous zealotry.

Naraj Siddiqi—The guide and translator on Hailey’s mission has gone underground—he’s either involved in the bombing of the refugee center or he’s running for his life.

Major Rex Denver—Framed for working with a terrorist group, the Delta Force commander has gone AWOL and is on the run, but he knows he’s onto a larger plot and can count on his squad to have his back and help clear his name.






Prologue


The boy, who’d introduced himself as Massoud, prodded his back with the old rifle as they made their way over the last of the rocks down the mountain.

The Afghan kid didn’t seem to know much English beyond the words he’d used to threaten his life, or maybe his elders had ordered him to keep his mouth shut in front of strangers—especially American soldiers.

He didn’t have any intention of harming the boy and hadn’t taken the kid’s earlier threat of bodily harm seriously. If that old Russian rifle could even shoot, Massoud barely looked big enough to hoist it and take aim. It worked well as a prop, though, giving his captor a false sense of courage.

He’d rather wind up wherever Massoud was leading him than lay waste to the kid in the mountains and be stuck making his way down by himself. He didn’t lay waste to children anyway, despite what the US military believed about him.

Massoud had actually helped him navigate the terrain, which would’ve been difficult to do with his bum leg. Probably saved his life. Of course, he could’ve been saving it just to have someone else take it later.

He drew up and tripped to a stop, the boy’s rifle jabbing him in the hip. He pointed to the huts with smoke rising from the center and a few goats tied up outside. He asked in Pashto, “Is this your village?”

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